Surgeon says government partnership needed to increase cleft surgeries

  • Experts say government needs to partner with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to address health issues
  • Dr Ifeanyichukwu Onah said such a partnership would ensure that more children with cleft deformities have access to free corrective surgeries.
  • Onah, however, said the government is currently involved in vaccinating children and should use this model to reach people born with a cleft.

FCT, Abuja- Plastic surgeon at the National Orthopedic Hospital in Enugu, Dr Ifeanyichukwu Onah said there was a need for the government to partner with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) such as Smile Train to ensure that more children with cleft deformities have access to free services. corrective surgeries.

Dr Onah, who revealed this in an interview with reporters, said the government is currently involved in childhood vaccinations and should use this model to reach all children born with a cleft.

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Buhari
The Buhari-led government has been asked to partner with NGOs to address some health needs. Photo credit: Aso Rock Villa
Source: Facebook

He said:

“We would like to have partnerships with the government so that when they do the vaccination the work of Smile Train and other NGOs involved in cleft surgeries can be advertised and people who know people with deformations of the slit can inform them of where to get the free Fini treatment.”

Worldwide, it is estimated that a baby is born with cleft deformity every three minutes. On average, one in 500 to 750 live births results in a cleft. While around 19,000 children are born with the disease every year in Africa, around 6,186 babies are born with it in Nigeria every year.

Therefore, Dr Onah noted that the government can also increase the health insurance campaign which covers children with cleft deformities so that when NGOs withdraw, after years of life impact, parents can still present their children for operations.

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He added:

“But if we continue to have less than 5% of Nigerians covered by health insurance, as we currently do, many people with cleft will find it difficult to know where to go and how to treat.”

Over the years, Smile Train has continued to dispel myths and misinformation surrounding cleft, providing funding, training and resources to healthcare professionals, enabling them to provide free, safe, timely cleft care. and complete throughout the year within the community.

Smile Train has active programs in over 70 countries worldwide, including 40 in Africa, working with over 255 partner surgeons on the continent.

Experts urge Nigerian government to improve investment in fissure research

Recall that cleft care experts at the 2nd Fundamentals of Cleft Research, Grants Writing and Publication Hybrid Training held recently by Smile Train called for more cleft research in Nigeria.

Legit.ng found that the training was organized in partnership with the National Surgical, Obstetrics, Anesthesia and Nursing Plan for Nigeria.

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According to Professor Emmanuel Ameh, Professor and Consultant Pediatric Surgeon at National Hospital Abuja, most birth defects diagnosed before the birth of a child are around 85-99% accurate.

Union of Journalists of Nigeria hails NGO support to deepen health care delivery

The Union of Nigerian Journalists (NUJ) has commended the intervention of some non-governmental organizations like Smile Train in bridging the healthcare gap in the health sector in Nigeria.

Speaking at a media roundtable in Abuja, the Chairman of the NUJ FCT Board, Mr. Emmanuel Ogbeche, stressed the need to encourage more investment in the health sector in Nigeria to ensure the well- be citizens and reduce health tourism.

Ogbeche stressed the need to encourage more investment in the health sector in Nigeria, as Smile Train has done.

Source: Legit.ng

Christine E. Phillips